Upgrade your luck


LUCKY FISH

 The fish is a lucky symbol, a touch stone, in many cultures which prize it as a sign of abundance, peace, creativity, protection when travelling, the fulfilling of one’s destiny and faith.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 In Maori legend, the fish pays a big part in the creation of our country.  Mythology tells us Maui fished up the North Island of New Zealand with a fish hook made from the jaw bone of his grandmother, as beautifully depicted by New Zealand's WETA Workshop in this illustration.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The fish hook symbolises abundance and plenty, strength and determination. It’s believed to bring peace, prosperity and good health.   It is a device for catching good luck and energy – which is the fish.  It is believed to provide safe journey over water, and is considered a good luck charm by travellers, boaties, fisherman and surfers in New Zealand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In China, the word ‘fish’ is pronounced the same way as the word ‘surplus’.  The fish in China means good luck – the consumer of a fish has money coming their way. They are assured of a prosperous and happy life. The fish is a gateway to an abundance or wealth of many good things, including money, food, health, fertility and happiness.   It has similar meaning in other Asian countries – such as India or Japan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Europe,  the Middle East and North Africa the fish also symbolises abundance, but it also signifies faith, life and protection. The fish has also been used within the hand of hamsa, or 'Hand of God'- a symbol used believed to protect women and bring happiness, luck and health in Jewish, Muslim and Christian faiths.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the early phase of Christianity, the fish was a symbol which, when drawn above a doorway of a home, served to protect those who dwelt inside.  It also signified the occupants of a home where Christian – Saint Peter the fisherman – the rock; the loaves and the fishes – generosity and abundance.

 

Upgrade your luck.  Eat chocfish.

 Every fish counts.